Pros and Cons of Viscose Rugs

Viscose rugs are a beautiful and luxurious addition to any home! Made from manufactured cellulose fabric treated with carbon disulfide and sodium hydroxide, viscose rugs offer the same comfort as natural fibers at a more affordable price. Plus, their silk-like qualities give them an elegant look that can’t be beat! However, they can be prone to shedding and may require special care to maintain their condition. We've listed pros and cons to consider when deciding whether a viscose rug is the right choice for your space.

Pros

  • Affordable: Compared to wool area rugs, viscose rugs are much more affordable. You can get a larger viscose rug at a fraction of what you’d pay for a similar silk or wool rug.
  • Soft: Viscose rugs have a smooth, silky texture that is soft to the touch. This makes them comfortable to walk on and adds a luxurious feel to a room. Viscose rugs are an excellent alternative that offer a similar level of softness and radiance as genuine silk.
  • Design & Appearance: Manufacturers have stepped up their production of viscose rugs in an array of shapes, colors and patterns. This vast selection has made them incredibly popular amongst consumers, who can easily find something that matches their budget and style.

Cons

  • Prone to Shedding: Viscose rugs tend to shed a little quite often, so it's important to vacuum them regularly to remove loose fibers and keep them looking fresh. Use a low-suction setting and avoid using a beater bar, as this can damage the fibers.
  • Not as Durable: Viscose rugs are not as resistant to wear and tear as other types of rugs, so they may not hold up as well in high-traffic areas. Viscose rugs are not the best option for homes with pets and young children.
  • Care & Cleaning: Viscose rugs are not as resistant to moisture as other types of rugs, so it's important to keep them away from areas where they may be exposed to water or high humidity. If a spill occurs, clean immediately with an absorbent cloth. Avoid scrubbing the spill, as this can cause the fibers to become damaged. For tougher stains, try spot cleaning the area with a mixture of water, white vinegar, and mild dish soap.